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Simple Funk-Blues backing track

110 BPM

Funk-Blues backing track
Try using A blues scale but targeting the chord tones as harmony changes.
Also try using only chord notes (arpeggios) over chords.
Why is this track so simple?

Because if you want to progress in your skills you must practice with easy and understandable music.

Play with this track for at least few weeks few times a day.
You'll notice that every time you do it better,with more understanding,more ideas flowing to your mind and fingers.
After enough repetitions improvising becomes your second nature-it becomes effortless and fluent.

Key to success in improvisation is a lot of repetitions and playing along easy and interesting jam tracks.



Once you can improvise over this jam track you'll find it much easier to play along with other,more demanding tracks or real tunes.

JS Bach - Prelude in Dm BWV 999

Famous Bach's tune played with an octave pitch shifter to get an 'church organ' sound.
Originaly tune is written in C minor but for guitar standard transcription is this one (D Minor) done by famous Segovia

Tarrega , Lagrima

Favorite among many classical guitarists for its easy to play,here played using line6 'gear box'
Being short piece,it's commonly paired with another Tarrega's mini masterpiece 'Adelita'

Radmila M. lullaby

One of the most beautifull guitar instrumentals (by Goran Bregovic and Vlatko Stefanovski)

Sta bi dao da si na mom mestu

By 'Bijelo Dugme'

Scarlatti Sonata k11, E minor

 

 

Etude In D , Fernando Sor


Gymnopedie No. 1 Erik Satie

E major waltz - Fernando Sor

An piece from famous Spanish composer and one of the most influential classical guitarists of all time Fernando Sor
Sor was one of few famous guitarists who played only with finger tips without nails.The other one was Tarrega who in later years abandoned nails and played only with finger tips.
Even Segovia recorded it in his Sor's etudes recording.It's labeled as Op.32 No.2
I recorded it in two versions-with nails and without nails.
There isn't so big difference for listener but for player it's a lot easier to bring out melody on high e string.And of course sound is much louder with less effort of the right hand

Aim Directed Movement on guitar-demonstration

This is an demonstration of ADM (aim-directed movement) from Aaron Shearer 's book "Learning the classic guitar, Volume 1"
ADM is a way to avoid confusion and error while playing.
The essence of ADM is this:
Knowing where and how to move before moving - seeing in your mind's eye the movements you'll make on the guitar before you actually make them.

1.You must completely understand movement before playing it on the guitar
2.Play the movement on the guitar as accurately as possible ,seeing your finger movements in your mind's eye an instant before you actually execute them.

This gives you 2 major benefits:
- First it keeps your mind from wondering and thinking about other things,and you stay focused on what are you playing
- Applying ADM you get additional time to prepare movements and to shift between positions and shapes.Otherwise you have to switch between chords/shapes instantly. ADM gives you additional 200-300 ms to prepare action and that's often crucial

B minor etude - Fernando Sor

Played twice first without nails then with nails.

E minor etude -Tarrega

Played without nails and then with nails.Also repeated as tremolo exercise.
Actually this piece can serve excellently as preparation for "recuerdos de la alhambra" .Because it is so much easier for the left hand then "alhambra" you can focus on tremolo

One tip which goes well for similar pieces (spanish romance ,and similar chord-melody-arpeggio patterns):
While playing one chord visualize on the fretboard the next one.That practically gives you additional time to prepare next chord.Otherwise you must change chords in an instant and that's hard.This way instead of switching chords instantly you have additional 200-300 milliseconds which is enough to smoothly move your left hand to another position/chord.

A minor Valcer-Matteo carcassi

An easy yet nice to listen and fun to play Valcer by Matteo Carcassi italian composer